Saturday, February 6, 2021

True or False Grammar Quiz




START THE QUIZ


1. "Founded" is the past simple and past participle of "Found". The past simple and past participle of "Find" is "Found".

TRUE
"Found" means to start an organization or an institution. The verb found is a regular verb and the past simple and past participle of "found" is "founded".
  • They founded the company 20 years ago.
Find is an irregular verb and the past simple and past participle of ‘find’ is found.
  • I think I've found a good friend.

2. We use "already" between a verb and a direct object.

FALSE
We use "already" to say something has happened before now or before a particular time in the past.
"Already" usually comes before the main verb or between the auxiliary and the main verb.
  • The movie has already started.
We can use "already" at the end of a sentence for emphasis.
  • I was tired already.
We don’t use "already" between a verb and a direct object.
  • I’ve already done it.
  • I’ve done already it.

3. We can use the adverb almost with "each", but not with "every".

FALSE
We don’t use each after words such as ‘almost’, ‘nearly’, or ‘not’.
  • Almost each bedroom has its own private bathroom.
  • Almost every child has their own room.

4. Intransitive verbs cannot be passive.

TRUE
An intransitive verb has a subject but no object. Intransitive verbs cannot be transformed to the passive. The verb ‘die’, as in ‘He died suddenly’, is intransitive.

5. We use the past continuous, not the past simple, to talk about past states or habits.

FALSE
We can use the past simple as an alternative to used to or would to talk about the things we did repeatedly in the past.
  • We went to the gym every day when we were young.
  • We were going to the gym every day when we were young.

6. Accommodation is an uncountable noun in British English.

TRUE
Accommodation is an uncountable noun. It means a place to live, work or stay in.
  • He was living in temporary accommodation.
Accommodation is often used as a plural noun In American English.
  • We need overnight accommodations in Houston.

7. Phrasal verbs always consist of two elements.

FALSE
Phrasal verbs are multi-word verbs. They consist of a verb and one or two particles or prepositions.
  • break on in
  • come up with
  • try out
  • pick up

8. We can use “what” as a relative pronoun.

FALSE
A relative pronoun is used to connect a relative clause to the rest of the sentence. The most common relative pronouns are who, whom, whose, which, that.

We don’t use "what" as a relative pronoun.
  • Houses that overlook the river cost more.
  • Houses what overlook the river cost more.

9. We only use “afraid” after a linking verb, not before a noun.

TRUE
Adjectives are usually placed before the nouns they modify, but adjectives with the prefix a- do not come before a noun. We use them after linking verbs such as be, seem, become. Common examples of adjectives with the prefix a-include afloat, addicted, afraid, alike, alive, alone, ashamed, asleep, awake

10. We can use two negative words in the same clause.

FALSE
In standard English, we don’t use two negative words in the same sentence to express a single negative idea.
The use of double negatives in English is not considered correct and you should avoid them.
  • I didn’t say nothing.
  • She never danced with nobody.

11. The word Police must always be used with a plural verb.

TRUE
The word Police is a plural noun and is followed by a plural verb.
The police are the official organization that is responsible to make people obey the law and to prevent and solve a crime; the people who work for this organization.
When talking about someone who works for the police, we say a police officer, a policeman, or a policewoman.
  • The police are coming!

12. Some adjectives do not have comparative and superlative forms.

TRUE
Some adjectives do not have comparative and superlative forms. They are called non-gradable adjectives, for example, nuclear, western, electronic. These adjectives cannot be modified by adverbs.

As or Like? Quiz

1. Steve looks nothing _____ his father. A) as B) like